FAQ

What made you write about dreams?

I became interested in my own dreams from an early age and later on from a professional interest. Many humanistic practitioners like myself were struggling to facilitate the meaning of dreams for our clients. I set out investigate five famous theories which have evolved over the past 100 years, took the strengths from each approach and developed my own model which consists of using metaphorical images. I wanted to extend my research to the general public.

Why did you include your own dreams as case studies?

I wanted to do something different from explaining other people’s dreams, and for the book to be authentic. I knew if I analysed my own dreams they would be right for me. The whole point of the book is, so individuals have the right tools to find hidden meanings in their dreams.  

Which theory is your favourite?

I formed an affinity with each theorist while I was writing about them, and during this time I thought each was better than the one before. However, the more I got to know them I found I could appreciate all of them for their individuality. They are fascinating characters, and I would like to have known them in person. For me there are no winners or losers. 

Can you analyse my dreams for me?

I'm happy to hear from readers, but I won’t be able to analyse your dreams as I'm now retired and no longer a member of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy who looks after clients’ interests. Please contact me directly via the contact page if you want to discuss a dream workshop or training regarding the theories.  

Will you write another book about dreams?

I realise there is potential to do more. I started my doctorate degree in 2003 and have been studying dreams for the past 15 years. There are a lot of bright people out there who I’m sure can take some of my ideas and expand them for other purposes. My interests now lie in the younger generation and my next book is about adolescents and social media.